So fellow scooter gals and LadyVespa, shoes. Shoes! By this point, I’ve done a good number of posts about being a responsible women rider, who wear responsible clothing and gear (yadda yadda yadda). Although I feel this piece is needed to balance all that safety gear information out and give some other examples. We all know how these following shoe choices would be absolutely fabulous to wear out on little rides around the city! These heels were made for us,

Of course, walking in these heels are a different story, but sitting on a vespa and riding around looking cute is fairly easy! (They call me “Grace”, and in the heels in these photos below, I’d mostly be sitting down than trying to walk in them.) Whatever you choose to wear on your vespa (and feet) is up to you, but if you were able (without thinking about real world limitations- mainly funding) to own the shoes of your dreams, which would they be? Below are some designer heels that I would love to own and wear out in Tel Aviv someday on the ‘pa, if I didn’t have to think about the price tags that adorn them:

Favorite of favorites:   (more…)

Happy Mother’s Day!!

Mothers, it’s your day! Where would we be without you?

Thank you for all you have done and for being an all-out fabulous women. 

“Mom” by 7-year-old Soren. (io9.com)

Also, head over Msbehaved.com for “a very MsBehaved Mother’s Day”! There will be plenty of nice, and tons of naughty, post concerning dear ‘ol mom throughout the day.

Cheers!

Last week was the International Female Ride Day 2012 and I asked those who were participating to send me over a shot of them with gear on while riding, so that I could show just how sexy women can be in gear. It seems like this years ride was indeed a huge success and brought in women riders all over the globe, who held various rallies and rides in their own communities.

It is really powerful to see such images again and again of these women, who sent me photos and posted them on the IFRD FB page, in their gear and really owning the image they represent. There is a pride from them that I haven’t really yet seen from the general vespa community and it was nice to find plenty of it around the IFRD group.  I didn’t see many vespa/scooter ladies over there, but maybe in the following years there will be a more diverse crowd of riders beyond those who only ride motorcycles. (I know we are out there!) Maybe the scooter and vespa ladies just haven’t found out about the event, as I just barely heard about it a week before the ride. They are a cool group of women, to be sure:  they were cool with sending photos of them on their bikes in for a vespa blog. Women riders are all riders, no matter what you ride. Respect.  (more…)

fantasy is not reality. 
Just in case y’all forgot, 

fantasy is not reality. 

This photo is currently being passed along the FB Scooter/Vespa pages, and I couldn’t resist displaying it here. She is a beauty to be sure, but OUCH! Brought to you by the guys over @MenPeopleWhoWon’tScootWithoutTonsofGearOnNutEpectWomenToLookLikeThis. Fantasy, shmanty: I look good with gear on and think that it is responsible to present another aspect of women who [really] ride. Any of you have photos out on rides with your gear on and want to show the world how it is done, please email me your photo. Let’s show ’em the sexy reality of our world: izevel1923@gmail.com.  (more…)

Are You “Vespa People”? And the story of my first ride on Roxy.

 This week on the ‘ol blog, I am looking forward to getting back to some of the basics about owning a vespa and provide some information I could have found very handy right before I purchased mine. I plan on writing out a few detailed posts that I think will help those out there looking to own a scooter and aren’t sure how to go about it. The questions you forget to ask are often the questions you’ll most regret, so I plan on asking you those in a few of this weeks posts. The posts will include topics such as maintenance, figuring out what questions you need to ask yourself before you even start asking questions to a dealer, and how you can figure out if a vespa is a better choice for you over another vehicle in this time in your life.

 I will go through more of these details from the very beginning steps of someone who is considering their options and wants a better idea of the larger picture and how owning a vespa could help/hinder that picture. If anyone has any questions they would like me to try and answer about these beginning steps before ownership, please leave a comment or get in touch with me (izevel1923@gmail.com). I’ll also write a bit about my own shortcomings with this whole vespa ownership deal that I really wasn’t aware of at the time of purchase and now better understand. I wanted to start off these writings with my first drive on Roxyvespa, from Jerusalem, the day I bought her to show you that things do indeed get better.

My First Ride, in summation:  It was a decent day with warm sun overhead and little wind, considering it was early December. Once the guy (who I bought it) from left, I knew I was on my own and that made me even more nervous. I haven’t drove before in Israel and have only heard, and seen, how bad Israelis are at the whole driving thing. And here I was just going headfirst into this mess on a Vespa. Sometimes, it is just better to do and stop thinking and this was clearly a good place to apply that lack of logic.

For the longer version (for those keen on vespas),  Continue reading

Ladyvespas: fierceness defined. 

 (Photo Credit: taken from the article, AARON HARRIS/FOR THE TORONTO STAR.)

I am so happy that, slowly, more and more articles about woman scooterists/motorcyclist are being written that takes the focus away from them as  sex symbols and more towards them being seen as regular riders and respected as such. I recently saw this one article posted by the Vespa Americas FB Page and wanted to share it here:

Scooter style: How to look good but avoid road rash.  (more…)

Controversial Tuesday: Ladyvespas and Gear or Lack Thereof) Part Two

Where is the line between fantasy and reality?

Part ii / Part i, click this.

What worries me is when this visual representation become reality (as with the images above) and the expectation for us (as woman scooterist) to provide and maintain- since it is the only visual context we have of women on scooters. What I mean by this is that images give us clues and information about rules and expectations for any said subject and shape an expectation for reality. When you only see images of woman on scooters with tons of skin showing and (cute!) heels over and over, you start believing that this is okay: it is what is normal. So you either follow suit or feel strange when you do wear all that silly protective gear because you aren’t going to need it.

Here is a comment from yesterterday’s post from thegallivant(thegallivant.wordpress.com) , that I thought really hit the core issue:

“This is such an important topic; for ladies who bike, or scoot, or rollerblade or participate in any activity that carries risk, there is always that inner debate: do I keep myself safe and risk looking…like I care about being safe? or do I choose to renege responsibility over my well-being so that I can potentially “look good” to passing males?”

Any woman, participating in any kind of activity,  feels pressure to always look sexy, no matter what the cost is to her person. These are inner dialogues that happen daily with woman and when it involves her safety, it shouldn’t have to be a question. There is a difference between the fantasy portrayed in these images and reality, but those images force an aesthetic that is hard to shake from your mind once you’ve seen it again and again. You want to be what you’ve seen, once you own your own vespa: you want to be That Vespa Babe. You want to portray that lifestyle and own every bit of the aesthetic yourself. You just have to realize that there is a “driving” aspect to this whole equation. ( BTW: Italian women, how do you do it?! I admire you so much.)

Ready for image overload?  Continue reading

Controversial Monday: LadyVespas and Gear, or Lack Thereof) Part 1

Scooter Chic: Safety Decisions for the LadyVespa: 

Pretty sure those lovely blue heels don’t fit in the ATGATT system,

The photo above is one of many examples how objectifying women could result in causing them harm when reality finally sets in. 

 Everywhere in the scooter culture, and community, you easily find various representations of women on a vespa/scooter. As with the rest of the general culture, these representations are meant to satisfy the male gaze and not really give character or substance to the woman herself. She is reduced to a [sexy] object riding another object: her safety isn’t an issue as long as she is visually pleasing. When you don’t see women wearing safety gear in many of those images (beyond the helmet, which is sometimes present), how does that start to affect your perception [as a woman] of the risks and dangers inherent to riding on two wheels? What does it mean when this reality isn’t considered nor reflected for us as women scooterist?

As a woman scooterist, I find myself always on the lookout for articles/photo shoots online that bring a change of perspective into this little ‘ol vespa world of ours. This includes trying to find images of other woman who scoot, so that I can learn from them and gain a better understanding of what is going on out there in the wider scooter community. These scooter babes are everywhere across the internet within these communities, and, while I adore these photos myself,  I know there is a conflict between these images and reality.  Continue reading