Charming West Texas, you give me faith in humanity. Updated.

A short tale of a small, West Texas town and the happenings of a woman on a scooter: 

There are some moments that you are able to be a part of that restore your faith in humanity, at least for a little bit, now and then. I admit that most of the time, I find myself in a bit of a hurry and adopting those “city slicker” moods when I come back to this area fondly referred to as “West Texas”. It is a charming area, where people still find time to stop and chat to one another before they go on their way. Of course, everyone here is more and more “busy” being modern and in a rush to get anywhere else, but they still have moments when that old-time charm creeps into their bones and takes over for a moment. These are the memories of Home I’ll always cherish and never cease to amaze me when I am able to bear witness to them happening in today’s world.   Continue reading

The Mods are here. 

Vespa Lifestyle, explained ii.

I must admit that I am not myself all that familiar with this particular subculture, but I find the history and images within this scene fascinating. This is another rather important facet to the vespa lifestyle, especially if you were born and raised in England. Proper respect must be paid to this particular happening within the larger vespa community and so it shall be. There is a slideshow at the bottom with tons of photos celebrating the Mod Lifestyle, via Vepsa.

The Vespa Lifestyle, via The Mods:

From www.squidoo.com/mod-subculture:

What are The Mods? Mod (from Modernist) is a subculture originated in london, england around late 1950’s and peaked in early-to-mid 1960’s.  (more…)

Vespa Lifestyle: Explained i

I received a few emails yesterday from people who weren’t really sure they knew anything about this “vespa lifestyle” that I spoke of and therefore wouldn’t be able to take part in the new contest. I got the feeling that maybe since they weren’t owners themselves, they somehow thought that they couldn’t offer their own version of what the iconic Vespa means and represent to/for them. Hogwash, is what I say to that!  (more…)

Happy, Happy Holiday! Or, Friday.

Sorry I haven’t been around much this week, as it has been a busy one to be sure with the whole Pesach thing here in Israel. (As a friend said it best, ‘Tzipporah, 1: Chametz, 0.” Ha. Of course, I didn’t really clean and left many bread crumbs scattered about. So my score would be more like: Me, .3: Chametz, 1,934.7.)

Anyway for ALL of you out there,

I hope you have a happy and lovely Friday and weekend!  Continue reading

Pinups for the Ladies: Updated with more menz!

Who said men on vespas aren’t sexy? 

Or at least, adorable?

So what if riding a vespa isn’t considered “mainly”? (Of course, this is pointed to the culture of the states rather than anywhere else. And I personally like the metrosexual tendencies myself.) Does that not mean that there are not those out there who want to see some eye candy of this particular kind?

Well, shalom to you. I think more of this would be good for world peace, don’t you?  Continue reading

Controversial Tuesday: Ladyvespas and Gear or Lack Thereof) Part Two

Where is the line between fantasy and reality?

Part ii / Part i, click this.

What worries me is when this visual representation become reality (as with the images above) and the expectation for us (as woman scooterist) to provide and maintain- since it is the only visual context we have of women on scooters. What I mean by this is that images give us clues and information about rules and expectations for any said subject and shape an expectation for reality. When you only see images of woman on scooters with tons of skin showing and (cute!) heels over and over, you start believing that this is okay: it is what is normal. So you either follow suit or feel strange when you do wear all that silly protective gear because you aren’t going to need it.

Here is a comment from yesterterday’s post from thegallivant(thegallivant.wordpress.com) , that I thought really hit the core issue:

“This is such an important topic; for ladies who bike, or scoot, or rollerblade or participate in any activity that carries risk, there is always that inner debate: do I keep myself safe and risk looking…like I care about being safe? or do I choose to renege responsibility over my well-being so that I can potentially “look good” to passing males?”

Any woman, participating in any kind of activity,  feels pressure to always look sexy, no matter what the cost is to her person. These are inner dialogues that happen daily with woman and when it involves her safety, it shouldn’t have to be a question. There is a difference between the fantasy portrayed in these images and reality, but those images force an aesthetic that is hard to shake from your mind once you’ve seen it again and again. You want to be what you’ve seen, once you own your own vespa: you want to be That Vespa Babe. You want to portray that lifestyle and own every bit of the aesthetic yourself. You just have to realize that there is a “driving” aspect to this whole equation. ( BTW: Italian women, how do you do it?! I admire you so much.)

Ready for image overload?  Continue reading

Controversial Monday: LadyVespas and Gear, or Lack Thereof) Part 1

Scooter Chic: Safety Decisions for the LadyVespa: 

Pretty sure those lovely blue heels don’t fit in the ATGATT system,

The photo above is one of many examples how objectifying women could result in causing them harm when reality finally sets in. 

 Everywhere in the scooter culture, and community, you easily find various representations of women on a vespa/scooter. As with the rest of the general culture, these representations are meant to satisfy the male gaze and not really give character or substance to the woman herself. She is reduced to a [sexy] object riding another object: her safety isn’t an issue as long as she is visually pleasing. When you don’t see women wearing safety gear in many of those images (beyond the helmet, which is sometimes present), how does that start to affect your perception [as a woman] of the risks and dangers inherent to riding on two wheels? What does it mean when this reality isn’t considered nor reflected for us as women scooterist?

As a woman scooterist, I find myself always on the lookout for articles/photo shoots online that bring a change of perspective into this little ‘ol vespa world of ours. This includes trying to find images of other woman who scoot, so that I can learn from them and gain a better understanding of what is going on out there in the wider scooter community. These scooter babes are everywhere across the internet within these communities, and, while I adore these photos myself,  I know there is a conflict between these images and reality.  Continue reading